Circle of Healing: Saving Farm Animals, Saving Abused Children

 

How One Bale Of Hay Can Save The World

 

 

Circle of Healing: Saving Farm Animals, Saving Abused Children

 

“We are looking forward to the opportunity to show people the power of these animals to teach the message of hope and compassion.” Ellie Laks, co-founder of THE GENTLE BARN.

It’s all happened in a century. Only one hundred years ago most of us lived on the land. Or made a living on the sea.

Hard to believe, eh? Most North Americans lived in the country — not the cold, ugly, industrial cityscapes that were growing like poisonous toadstools over the planet.

Although the Industrial Revolution had been tearing our extended families apart for 300 years, pulling young men and women into the coalsmoke clouded cities, most of us still had a real relationship with the living countryside.

In fields, in barns, in the woodlands, in small country churches, we gathered and grew.  In my case, I grew up in harness racing country, surrounded by all of these, and stables, and lots of horses and lots of animals.  I was blessed.

But for most of the world, that blessed relationship is mostly torn apart today. And with it, an essential spiritual emptiness haunts us.

The animals are suffering because of that. Humans are suffering because of it. Especially children.

But here’s some wonderful Good News!

“THE GENTLE BARN has more than 100 animals who eat organic hay at their three locations in California, Tennessee and Missouri.” [1]

Doesn’t sound all that impressive? Here’s what’s happening, mon ami…

“With increasing headlines of violence and social disparity, it’s easy to become discouraged.”

THE GENTLE BARN founders Ellie Laks and Jay Weiner are very aware of the challenges our world faces and are dedicated to making it better through a variety of animal-therapy based programs.

“When supporters donate toward the purchase of a bale of hay for GENTLE BARN animals, it allows us to use our ‘general funds’ to do our work, rescuing animals and bringing in groups of children who desperately need our programs,” says Ellie.

“People are losing hope! We work every day to restore faith in humanity and help people become gentle and respectful in their daily lives. By supporting THE GENTLE BARN you’re supporting peace on this planet.”

In addition to providing sanctuary to abused and neglected animals, THE GENTLE BARN educates children and adults about compassion as their mission statement reads: “Teaching People Kindness and Compassion to Animals, Each Other and our Planet”

“When you donate towards a bale of hay, you’re not just feeding a rescued animal you’re also healing their hearts and showing them the power of a gentle world,” says Ellie.

“In turn, once the animals recover and learn to trust humans again, they are able to give back unconditional love and hope through our many programs to wounded warriors, victims of domestic violence, children escaping gangs and drug and alcohol abuse. Please help us complete this vital circle of healing.”

To support THE GENTLE BARN Hay Fund, please visit: http://www.gentlebarn.org/donate/

– Brian Alan Burhoe

Did you like this Animal Post?

IF SO, YOU’LL LOVE WOLFBLOOD — MY MOST POPULAR ANIMAL STORY:

“I JUST READ WOLFBLOOD AGAIN FOR GOOD MEASURE.  ONE FOR ANY WOLF LOVER.  ENJOYED IT BUT WISH IT WAS A FULL LENGTH NOVEL.” – Gina Chronowicz @ginachron

“GREAT SHORT STORY!  DOES REMIND ME OF CALL OF THE WILD, WHITE FANG…” – Evelyn @evelyn_m_k

In the Land of  Northern Lights, a lonely young wolf  searches for its place in the wild forests.  A tale in the Jack London Tradition!  FREE TO READ ==>  WOLFBLOOD: A Wild Wolf, A Half-Wild Husky & A Wily Old Trapper

 

Circle of Healing: Saving Farm Animals, Saving Abused Children

Source: Civilized Bears, The Gentle Barn & PR Newswire

[1] ABOUT THE GENTLE BARN:
A national nonprofit founded in 1999 as a safe haven and place of recovery for severely abused animals. THE GENTLE BARN offers their unique philosophy of rehabilitating animals and connecting their stories of survival and healing to the experiences of children in need who have suffered physical, mental or emotional trauma. By interacting with the animals and taking a hands-on role in their welfare, program participants learn empathy, trust and forgiveness. THE GENTLE BARN is supported by celebrities such as Ellen Degeneres, David Backes, Daisy Fuentes, Richard Marx, Jenna & Channing Tatum, Steve-O, Rikki Rocket and Hilary Swank…   See www.gentlebarn.org

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Tom West – The Man Who Wrote His Western Stories In Gunsmoke

 

A TOM WEST BIBLIOGRAPHY

 

 

Tom West – The Man Who Wrote His Western Stories In Gunsmoke

 

Early in his novel RATTLESNAKE RANGE, Tom West introduces us to his protagonist:

Home was to Brick Riley any spot where he spread his soogans. When he was knee-high, his parents had been butchered in a Comanche raid. With no more roots than a tumbleweed, he drifted where the winds of chance wafted him, knowing no friends beyond his horse and gun, and craving none. Blocky, belligerent, sinewy as a range colt, with square features and a stubborn jaw, Riley took life as he found it — and found it good.

But Brick Riley, hired gun, soon found himself in a new kind of battle.  READ ON…

The newcomer, his long jaw working on a chaw, dismounted and stumped toward him. “The name’s Saxon, Bill Saxon,” he volunteered. “What in hell’s the idea of fencing our water?”

“Your water, hell!” returned Riley. “Circle C claims Granite Wells and hired me to watch it.” He tapped his holster.

The nester stood chewing, his faded eyes traveling over Riley. They dwelt on the white stars that decorated the tops of Riley’s boots. “You from Texas?”

“Sure am!”

“Shake! I was raised outside San Antone, in the Brasada country.” He thrust a hand through the barbed wire.

Riley gripped it. “They call me Brick,” he said.

The nester leaned down and yanked up his right overall leg. The limb was severed, the knee cradled in a leather bucket from which protruded a wooden stub. “Lost that leg fighting for the South,” he commented, “fighting for freedom. What you fighting for, Brick?”

“The iron that pays me,” returned Riley, a trifle tightly.

“And I reckon you’re mighty slick with that gun,” observed Saxon thoughtfully.

“Tolerable.”

“Wal,” said the nester as his eyes dwelt reflectively on the young Texan. “I got a woman down in the basin, and two gals, all dehydrated and panting for a sip of water, but I ain’t trading lead with no fellow Texan.” Sorrowfully, he eyed the murky run-off from the Wells dribbling under the fence. “Can’t even git the mules to stomach that alkali water we got,” he mourned, “but I guess my gals got no choice.”

With a sigh, Riley stepped to the gate, lifted the wire loop and swung it open. “Fill your doggone churns,” he invited, “and quit breaking my heart.”

No sooner had Saxon and his mules disappeared down canyon when the squeal of ungreased hubs told of another approaching vehicle. A decrepid wagon hove into view, mule-drawn, a lone woman with stringy hair holding the lines.

“Sorry ma’am,” he shouted. “No water.”

Reins slack in her workworn hands, she sat eying him, lined features stamped with the stoic, somber cast of the pioneer woman. “Mister, we just got to get water!”

The woman reached down and lifted a heavy buffalo gun…

 

I first discovered Tom West about age twelve.

It was after a Western matinee movie, checking out the latest Dell comics and paperback books in the small bookstore and newsstand next to the old Saint John City Market main entrance.

I picked up a book with exciting covers on both sides. It was probably the cover of Paul Durst’s KANSAS GUNS that caught my attention — a gun-shot hombre falling from a big horse coming right at you. I loved horses. Flipped over the book and there was a second novel, THE CACTUS KID by someone called Tom West.

Well, 35¢ — I could get three comic books for that, and still have a nickle left for popcorn next Saturday’s matinee. But I had saved my summer jobs money. That day I could afford it. I’m gettin’ it! Home, I read ’em both. THE CACTUS KID was a yarn and a half.

Tom West became my favourite Western writer. Still is.

I’m not the only one. Folks loved his Westerns, packed with action of course, but giving us a cast of cantankerous case-hardened careworn characters the like of which we may have met in real life, but rarely in fiction — well, until Clint Eastwood’s Man With No Name later wandered a similar kind of a sunbaked Southwest. Remember Piripero, the grizzled old coffin-maker from A Fistful of Dollars? Right out of Tom West’s reality.

And here’s the good news, my friend — with 67 known novels, I’m still finding new Tom West books!  Meeting new Tom West characters.  Life is good.

 

HERE’S MY COMPLETE & UNABRIDGED
TOM WEST BIBLIOGRAPHY: 

Meddling Maverick (1944)
Bushwack Basin (1945)
Gambler’s Gold* (1946)
Trouble Trail (1946)
Renegade Range (1946)
Six-gun Showdown (1947)
Tangled Trail** (1948)
Powdersmoke Pay-off (1948)
Renegade Ranch** (1948)
Spectre Spread (1948)
Red Range** (1949)
Six Gun Sheriff (aka The Desperado Code)** (1949)
Ghost Gold (1949)
Flaming Feud (1951)
Vulture Valley (1951)
Ghost Gun (1952)
Gunsmoke Gold (1952)
Lobo Legacy (1954)
Outlaw Brand (1956)
Beware Of This Tenderfoot** (1956)
Torture Trail (1957)
Draw And Die!** (1958)
Lead In His Fists (1958)
Slick on the Draw (1958)
The Cactus Kid (1958)
Twisted Trail (1959)
Nothing But My Gun (1960)
The Phantom Pistoleer (1960)
Side Me With Sixes (1960)
Double Cross Dinero (1960)
Killer’s Canyon (1961)
The Gun From Nowhere (1961)
The Buzzard’s Nest (1962)
Battling Buckeroos (1962)
Dead Man’s Double Cross (1962)
Triggering Texan (1963)
Lobo Lawman (1963)
Gallows Gulch (1963)
Don’t Cross My Line (1964)
The Man at Rope’s End (1964)
Sidewinder Showdown (1964)
Bushwack Brand (1965)
The Toughest Town in the Territory (1965)
Battle at Rattlesnake Pass (1965)
Lost Loot of Kittycat Ranch (1965)
Rattlesnake Range (1966)
Hangrope Heritage (1966)
Bitter Brand (1966)
Showdown at Serano (1967)
Crossfire at Barbed M (1967)
Bandit Brand (1967)
The Face Behind the Mask (1968)
Write His Name in Gunsmoke (1968)
Black Buzzards of Bueno (1969)
Renegade Roundup (1969)
Scorpion Showdown (1969)
Desperado Doublecross (1970)
Bucking For Boot Hill (1970)
Lobo of Lynx Valley (1971)
Sweetgrass Valley Showdown (1971)
Corral This Killer (1973)
Lone Gun (1974)
Shootout At Sentinel Wells (1974)
Payoff at Piute (1977)
Sagebrush Showdown (1979)
Trigger Tyrant (1979)
Hard Trail To Santa Fe (1980)

* As written by Peter Field
** As written by Roy Manning

Tom only published one non-fiction title:
HEROES ON HORSEBACK: The Story of the Pony Express, by Tom West, Four Winds Press, New York, 1969; Blackie & Son, London and Glasgow, 1972

On a number of occasions, Tom donated some of his published manuscripts to the University of Wyoming American Heritage Center for their Western Writers archives.   They were sent directly to the university from ACE Books offices in New York City.  The Tom West Collection (“circa 1950 – circa 1970”), Accession Number 00528, is stored in two containers at the Heritage Center.  “There are no access restrictions on the materials for research purposes, and the collection is open to the public.” [1]

 

WHO WAS TOM WEST?

If you’ve never read his Bio, you’re in for some surprises, my friend.

Want to learn more about Tom’s great Western novels?

SEE my most popular Western Post, my heartfelt tribute: “Life and Works of Western Writer Tom West”

==>>TOM WEST – Classic Ace Double Western Writer Remembered & Reviewed

 

Was Italian filmmaker Sergio Leone influenced by Tom Brown?  To learn more about this and see two new Tom Brown ACE Book Reviews, Go Now To ==>> Tom West ACE Double Western Book Reviews: NOTHING BUT MY GUN & TRIGGERING TEXAN!

 

From the beginning, Tom’s Westerns were quickly reprinted in softcover.  Some of his earliest hardcovers from Dutton —  including MEDDLING MAVERICK, BUSHWHACK BASIN and SPECTRE SPREAD — appeared in Hillman Publication Western Pulp Magazine Digest format as full length novels.

Before he became an almost ACE exclusive author, he had works reprinted as paperbacks by Pocket Books, Prestige Books, Pyramid Books, Magnum Books and Lancer Books.  The last Tom West published novel was HARD TRAIL TO SANTA FE, from Kensington Publishing’s Zebra Books paperback imprint in 1980.

Tom West’s stories were also published in England, Canada and Australia. And, in translation, Mexico, Denmark, Germany, Spain, Portugal, Argentina.  His books were sold throughout Europe.

From the early 60’s to 1977 the Librairie des Champs Elysées, Paris, published 18 of Tom’s titles, such as RATTLESNAKE RANGE (as L’OR DU CIRCLE C), LOBO LAWMAN (as LE JUSTICIER DU RIO GRANDE) and LOST LOOT OF KITTYCAT RANCH (as LE RANCH MAUDIT — “The Cursed Ranch”).

Librairie des Champs Elysées released them as part of their bestselling “Le Masque Western” paperback imprint. They are still collected today.

Created by French publisher Albert Pigasse in 1927, Le Masque Western series also produced Westerns by Louis L’Amour, Gordon D Shirreffs, Elmore Leonard, Clifton Adams, Clay Fisher, William Hopson, Ray Hogan, Giles A Lutz and Lewis Byford Patten.  Cover art was by some of the top American illustrators (in order of publication): Norman Rockwell, Gerald Powell, Frank McCarthy, Stanley Walter Galli, George Gross, Vic Prezio and the evocative Mort Künstler.

NOTE ON ILLUSTRATORS: Image at top of page is a detail from the painting used to illustrate the 1972 ACE edition of RATTLESNAKE RANGE, cover art by Gerald “Jerry” McConnell.

Born in New Jersey in 1931, Gerald McConnell illustrated over 2000 paperback covers in his lifetime.

Although he worked in a number of genres, such as the 1966 ACE edition of Ursula K LeGuin’s science fiction novel ROCANNON’S WORLD, most of his published works were in the Western field. McConnell later taught at the Pratt Institute School of Design and, in 1981, was given the Society of Illustrators’ Hamilton King Award.

Gerald McConnell also illustrated Tom’s DOUBLE-CROSS DINERO.

The cover artist of Tom West’s 1968 ACE edition of WRITE HIS NAME IN GUNSMOKE was Victor Prezio. Passing at only age 52 in 1976, Vic Prezio didn’t leave a large legacy of cover artwork. Although he did some Comic Book cover illustrations (DELL Comics Space Man and CLASSICS ILLUSTRATED Robin Hood), most of his paintings were for the popular Men’s Magazines and paperbacks of the 50’s and 60’s. Vic’s acrylic, gouache and oil paintings still sell at art auctions. [2]

[1] Among other Western writers included in the American Heritage Center Western Writer collections are Jack Shaefer, William Colt MacDonald, Cifton Adams, S Omar Barker, Matt Braun, Merle Constiner, Will Cook, Dan Cushman, Harry Sinclair Drago, L L Foreman, Norman A Fox…

[2] ILLUSTRATORS: Often, ACE Books used the same cover painting for different titles, different authors. So the illustrations didn’t always reflect scenes from the stories. I suppose the cost of paying for two novels and two illustrations for every new printing was prohibitive.

And sometimes the cover artist has been forgotten.

The image to the left of an hombre reaching for his sidearm behind a broken white fence was originally used as the cover illustration for Tom West’s THE CACTUS KID, 1958 ACE edition, the book I had discovered so long ago.

The painting — “mixed media on board” — recently went up for sale through Heritage Auctions.  The painting is not signed.  “Artist unknown.”  And not sold.  Lost forever — except on old pinewood bookshelves, eh?

– Brian Alan Burhoe

Tom West – The Man Who Wrote His Western Stories In Gunsmoke

First Web Publication of Tom West’s Complete Bibliography

ACE Doubles, ACE Double Western, ACE Double Westerns, ACE Tall Twin Western, bibliography, book list, book review, Brian Alan Burhoe, Fred East, Gerald McConnell, Rattlesnake Range, Tom West, Tom West Bibliography, Tom West book list, Western writer, Western book review, Write His Name In Gunsmoke

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Goodbye Rhinos – Last Three Northern White Rhinos Statue

 

“The Last Three Northern White Rhinos to Occupy New York City”

 

Wildlife Artists Gillie and Mark with Sudan,
the last male Northern White Rhyno, 2017
 

Watching Sudan, Najin and Fatu, the last three living Northern White Rhinos in the world, walk around, eat, play, has got to be one of the most touching and heartrending sights ever. After all, when they die so do all Northern White Rhinos!

Think of it!  In a few thousand years, Humankind has spread out over an entire planet, slaughtered and gobbled up just about every big animal it’s stumbled upon, and now Homo Domesticus is systematically cleaning up as many smaller creatures as we can get our grasping primate hands on — with the help of our many, many machines.

But, maybe…  Maybe if we shed a tear for those last rhinos — maybe we’ll somehow find the heart and power to save so many more threatened species.

Australian artists and conservationists, Gillie and Marc, will launch Goodbye Rhinos at Astor Place in New York City with the installation of their “The Last Three” sculpture in January 2018.

The campaign is a valiant effort to raise awareness of, not only those soon-to-be extinct Northern White Rhinos, Sudan, Najin and Fatu, but of all endangered species. [1]

Gillie and Marc will be in New York City in January 2018 for the installation and unveiling of “The Last Three,” which will be streamed in a live broadcast by Nat Geo Wild. Visitors are welcome to view the sculpture at Astor Place from January 5, 2018 to April 15, 2018. After April 15, the experience will travel to The Rockefeller Center.

The statue’s creators have “traveled to Kenya, Africa to visit Sudan, Najin and Fatu where they live, heavily guarded in their own sanctuary.”

They spent time photographing, sketching and filming the docile rhinos from up close to better understand and get to know them. The sculpture will be the largest rhino sculpture to have been created, standing 16 feet tall and will be made from bronze.

The installation will feature three life-size, bronze Northern White Rhino sculptures mounted on top of one another.

By creating a space where visitors can see, touch and interact with the rhinos, Gillie and Marc hope to inspire visitors.

They also encourage visitors to leave their goodbye messages to the rhinos on the Goodbye Rhinos website, which will double as a petition to the United Nations to put an end to rhino poaching. The conservationists’ goal is to generate one million signatures on their petition. [2]

The creation of the sculpture was funded through Gillie and Marc’s Goodbye Rhinos’ Kickstarter campaign, headlined “Goodbye Rhinos: Goodbye Planet Earth!

“Help us make the BIGGEST RHINO SCULPTURE IN THE WORLD,” said Gillie and Marc on their Kickstarter page. “To build a legacy for the last three Northern White Rhinos and save Planet Earth.”

They went on to explain, “A rhino horn is worth more than its weight in gold or diamonds, and to some people money is worth more than a life. Because of this, only three Northern White Rhinos remain and within a few years this beautiful species will be lost forever!”

Gillie and Marc “travelled to Kenya in March 2017 to the Ol Pejeta Conservancy — the second largest conservancy in Kenya with around 90,000 acres — to share time with the last three surviving Northern White Rhinos in the world.”

These 3 surviving Northern White Rhinoceroses are “guarded 24 hours a day to protect them from poaching, which is a major problem for rhinoceroses. The protection includes horn-imbedded transmitters, watchtowers, fences, drones, guard dogs, and trained armed guards around the clock.”

Gillie and Marc were told that Sudan only has 2 years to live, “so this project has to happen now if he is to live out the rest of his life in peace.”

So there’s time yet, mon ami, time when we can still say, “Hello Rhinos!”

– Brian Alan Burhoe

Do You Agree With This Wildlife Post?

IF SO, YOU MIGHT WANT TO READ WOLFBLOOD — MY MOST POPULAR ANIMAL STORY:

“I JUST READ WOLFBLOOD AGAIN FOR GOOD MEASURE.  ONE FOR ANY WOLF LOVER.  ENJOYED IT BUT WISH IT WAS A FULL LENGTH NOVEL.” – Gina Chronowicz @ginachron

“GREAT SHORT STORY!  DOES REMIND ME OF CALL OF THE WILD, WHITE FANG…” – Evelyn @evelyn_m_k

An “exhilarating tale of canine loyalty and love” in the Jack London Tradition of a lone Timber Wolf and it’s quest for its place in the great Northern forests.  FREE TO READ ==>  WOLFBLOOD: A Wild Wolf, A Half-Wild Husky & A Wily Old Trapper

 

[1] “Rabbitgirl and Dogman have a dream.” Playful and Loving — Be sure to visit Gillie and Marc on their wonderful website https://gillieandmarc.com

[2] “Leave their goodbye messages to the rhinos on the Goodbye Rhinos website…” https://www.goodbyerhinos.org

Goodbye Rhinos – Last Three Northern White Rhinos Statue

Source: Civilized Bears, Gillie and Marc & PRNewswire

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October Is Adopt A Dog Month – Rescue Puppies or Older Dogs

 

Be a Hero to Dogs Young and Old at Your Local Shelter — Adopt a Rescue Dog

 

 

“During Adopt A Dog Month, don’t forget to consider older animals who often face the highest risk in animal shelters!”

We know a number of older folks — usually couples — who have said, “Never again!” after losing a beloved dog.

Part of it is the devastation of losing a cherished pet. We really DO love ’em, eh? The love, loyalty and attention that a dog can give to its humans can be amazing. As one friend said to us, “We didn’t realize what a loving presence Winnie was in our family. Always greeting us with tail wags. Always aware of us, always watching us with those big brown eyes. She left such a hole in our lives. We can never replace our Winnie.”

That relationship is so essential to us. In fact we’ve known some seniors, usually on their own, who’ve said “Animals are much more loving and loyal than people.” Followed by bitter comments about the Human race. The first time we heard that we were shocked. Now we understand it. We certainly agree with Doris Day’s “I’ve never met an animal I didn’t like, and I can’t say the same thing about people.” [1]

Another part of the “Never again” is that some older couples just don’t feel able to handle the physicality of training a dog again through its wild puppyhood. Especially people who love big dogs. The unintentional bites and bruises and constant energy can be too much for folks at a certain stage of life.

But what’s happening now is this. After a while they miss that companionship. That attention. That undying loyalty — and love. And they begin to say, “Well, we’ve been hearing about rescue dogs…”

Here’s the answer.

Each October, American Humane, America’s first national humane organization and the nation’s leading first responder for animals in need, encourages animal lovers to consider adopting dogs from a local shelter or rescue group in honor of its yearly “Adopt-a-Dog Month®.” [2]

This year, American Humane is “continuing its national initiative to bring awareness to a vital issue: The need to provide safe, loving homes for the thousands of older pets who often face the highest risk in animal shelters.”

Each year, they stated in a press release, “an estimated 670,000 dogs are euthanized in the nation’s shelters.”

Many potential pet adopters overlook older animals — but there are so many reasons why dogs over the age of 6 or 7 make ideal furry family members and friends:

  1. They tend to be less rambunctious than younger dogs.
  2. They’re often already house-trained.
  3. They’re a great fit for people with busy lifestyles.
  4. They’re so grateful for a second chance.
  5. They love you unconditionally.

“It’s heartbreaking to think about all the senior animals who had been cherished pets before they suddenly found themselves confused and alone in shelter kennels,” said Dr. Robin Ganzert, president and CEO of American Humane. “Far too often this happens to many older dogs through no fault of their own —after their human owners encounter financial troubles, illness, or other life upheavals.”

This need is gaining attention across the country. Numerous stories are appearing on the news, and a marvelous book, “MY OLD DOG: Rescued Pets with Remarkable Second Acts,” by TODAY.com writer Laura T Coffey and photographer Lori Fusaro, highlights how much senior dogs have to offer. MY OLD DOG shares happy adoption success stories and celebrates the grand times that can be had with shelter dogs past the age of puppyhood.

“Senior dogs who get adopted from shelters just might be the most grateful dogs on the planet,” explained author Laura Coffey. “And don’t let their age fool you! It’s amazing to see how much these dogs still have to offer and teach us.”

Your local shelter is the perfect place to find dogs of every type, size, age and personality – all waiting for a loving home. Or if you prefer a particular breed that isn’t currently available at a shelter, go online to find a legitimate breed-specific rescue group in need of adopters like you. In fact, why not help build momentum and spread the word by adding your name to our pledge to make your next pet a rescue or shelter animal and “like” us on Facebook and Twitter.

Here are a variety of ways to celebrate Adopt-A-Dog Month:

Adopt from a shelter or rescue group.
When you’re ready to open your heart and home to a new best friend, consider dog adoption from your local animal shelter or rescue group. Talk with shelter staff to find the perfect dog for you and your lifestyle, and remember that older dogs make excellent pets too. Adopt a dog for free today.

Spay or neuter your dog.
Have your dog spayed or neutered, thus preventing the possibility of unexpected, and potentially unwanted, puppies. Spayed and neutered animals have been shown to lead longer, healthier lives and have fewer of certain behavioral problems than animals who have not been spayed or neutered.

ID your pet.
By putting identification on your dog, either in the form of a tag, a microchip or both, you will reduce the possibility that your pet will become one of the presumably “homeless” dogs that end up at your local shelter. Only 15 to 20 percent of dogs who enter a shelter are reunited with their owners. Make sure your dog is one of the fortunate few by outfitting him with proper identification!

Support your local shelter.
Show the pets at your local shelter or rescue group that you care by donating time, money or supplies like pet food, leashes, beds and toys. Call the shelter to see what supplies or services are needed most. Even the smallest effort can make a difference.

And really — REALLY — consider adopting an adult dog!

– Brian Alan Burhoe

Do You Agree With This Canine Post?

IF SO, YOU MIGHT WANT TO READ WOLFBLOOD — MY MOST POPULAR ANIMAL STORY:

“I JUST READ WOLFBLOOD AGAIN FOR GOOD MEASURE.  ONE FOR ANY WOLF LOVER.  ENJOYED IT BUT WISH IT WAS A FULL LENGTH NOVEL.” – Gina Chronowicz @ginachron

“GREAT SHORT STORY!  DOES REMIND ME OF CALL OF THE WILD, WHITE FANG…” – Evelyn @evelyn_m_k

An “exhilarating tale of canine loyalty and love” in the Jack London Tradition of a lone Gray Wolf and it’s search for its place in the spreading Northern forests.  FREE TO READ ==>  WOLFBLOOD: A Wild Wolf, A Half-Wild Husky & A Wily Old Trapper

 

[1] See “Women Pioneers of Animal Rights” at www.CivilizedBears.com/Women-Pioneers-Animal-Rights

[2] About American Humane: founded in 1877, American Humane is the first national humane organization in the US. To learn more visit them at www.americanhumane.org today.

October Is Adopt A Dog Month – Rescue Puppies or Older Dogs

Source: Civilized Bears, American Humane & PRNewswire

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Carl Kidwell – Artist and Writer – His Illustrations and Stories

 

Carl Kidwell – Artist & Writer – His Life, Illustrations and Stories

 

 

I first came across Carl Kidwell as the illustrator of William Byron Mowery’s SAGAS OF THE MOUNTED POLICE.  I’d never heard of Carl, but I liked his book cover artwork and set out to find more about him.

I discovered an interesting artist. [1]

American author and illustrator Carl Edmund Kidwell was born in Washington, Daviess County, Indiana on August 8, 1910.  At that time Daviess County was a thriving farming area, including a number of Amish settlements.  And Carl’s hometown was a major depot and repair yard for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, which provided local employment.

Carl was the eleventh of twelve children from his father’s two marriages. He was closest to his brother Logan, last-born and two years younger than Carl — together they used to sit out on the front porch, happily playing music together.  Their music would often draw an audience of family, friends and neighbors.

Due to illness in his teens, Carl missed out on formal education but took the free time to discover his artistic skills.

After he recovered, he entered the work force at a number of jobs, including soda jerk, bellhop, railway coach painter and, for a year, a member of the Civilian Conservation Corps.

It was the Depression, and work was hard to find.

Carl and Logan decided to become travelling photographers.  They bought an old car and a camera, made a passable photo booth and traveled around the countryside.  For the next few years, they would set their booth up at fairs, carnivals and amusement parks.  They developed the photos on the spot.  Charging a quarter for three photos.

It was Logan who first joined the Navy in the late 30’s.

Carl joined next, serving as a radioman.

His first ship was the heavy cruiser USS Quincy, where he joined his brother Logan, already stationed there.

On the Quincy the Kidwell shipmates cruised the Atlantic from the Caribbean islands to the Canadian Arctic, where they thrilled at the sights of huge gleaming white icebergs and swirling Northern Lights.  They even shared shore leave at African ports.  “It was a crowded and eventful year, and I’ve always been grateful for it,” Carl later wrote in a letter.

After Pearl Harbor, Carl was re-assigned to another ship.

On August 9, 1942, the Quincy was sunk, a victim of enemy action off Guadalcanal Island.  Logan was lost in the attack. [2]

Years later, approaching his 80th birthday, Carl wrote, “As long ago as it was, it is still so real and vivid in my mind.  Logan and I were always very close, and even after all this time, I still miss him.”

Carl served on three other ships (two of which, including the USS Indianapolis, were also later sunk) before being transferred full-time to the US Naval Training Center in Miami, Florida.

He began to spend most of his off-duty hours sketching the ships, his crewmates and the seascapes around him.

Carl’s first illustrations appeared in The Chaser, a monthly newsletter from the Naval Training Center (left: Carl’s cover of the March 16, 1945 edition), and in Our Navy, a Standard publication of the US Navy, for public distribution.

Early commercial sales were “Sketched on a Sub Chaser” in the March 20, 1943 issue of the weekly magazine Liberty and “From a Sailor’s Sketchbook” in the October, 1943 issue of The Blue Book Magazine.  He sold a few more through the war years and after to Blue Book, including interior art for short stories such as “Sea Serpent, Ahoy!” by Crawford Sullivan (May, 1946 edition).

Living on his own in the challenging postwar years, Carl became a professional freelance illustrator, producing both magazine and book illustrations as well as cover art.

Carl sold artwork to a number of science fiction, mystery and horror titles such as Other Worlds Science Stories, Weird Tales, Startling Mystery Stories and Magazine of Horror.

And created the cover artwork for hardcover books in the adventure, historical and Western fields.

While Carl seems to have begun and ended his commercial career drawing effective pen and ink illustrations for the pulp magazines, his most inspired works were the covers for Westerns and juvenile adventure books.

Like Marjorie A Zapf’s THE MYSTERY OF THE GREAT SWAMP, which told the tale of Jeb, a boy who finds “the last survivors of an almost extinct mound-building Indian tribe hidden deep in the Okefenokee swampland.”

Jeb learns to understand and feel deep sympathy for these last two of a dying race: an Indian boy his own age and his elderly grandmother.  He will keep their secret.

And POSSE OF TWO by Gertrude Bell, the frontier yarn of Ned Belt and Dave Woods who join ranks to hunt down an outlaw band who stole something from each of them — Ned, a beloved stallion — and Dave, his late father’s Hawkins rifle.

And THE BARREL by Ester Wier.  Abandoned by his father as child, and a constant runaway from foster parents, Chance Reedy finally finds his real family: his illiterate Granny and brother Turpem.  They live deep in the swamplands of the Florida Everglades.  There, the two brothers fight, then find a deep bond.

CRY VIVA! by prolific pulp and paperback Western writer William Hopson tells the story of Gringo Don Guillermo, a man handy with a shootin’ iron.

Hopson  knew about ranches and his descriptions of Old Mexican haciendas in CRY VIVA! were right on.

It’s the time of Pancho Villa, revolution and bad banditos.  Those men have attacked and burned the hacienda of Guillermo’s patron, Don Sebastian, who stands his ground.  And then there is Sabastion’s proud, passionate daughter, Torcuata…

There’s something about the wild places in Carl Kidwell’s artwork that really lives — the wild places and the struggle of lost souls to find a family — these are the themes that brought out his best work.

In the late Fifties, Carl Kidwell developed a fascination with early Mexico, its landscape and people of pre-colonial history.  Perhaps he was inspired while researching his painting for the dust jacket art of the Bouregy & Curl edition of William Hopson’s CRY VIVA!

He not only sketched and created the illustrations, but wrote two books about Mexico: ARROW IN THE SUN and THE ANGRY EARTH.

“To shoot an arrow into the sun, one must climb a lofty mountain.”  The story of ARROW IN THE SUN (Viking Press, New York, 1961) reminds me of Mel Gibson’s Apocalypto.  Although Carl wrote about the Aztecs, not Mayans, the themes were similar.

Hidden in the forest of the Valley of Mexico, Prince Netzah watched the terrible murder of his father, King of Acolhuacan…  What follows is a story of running, hiding, escaping (from being sacrificed to the Fire God), waiting — and vengeance.

Also set in the Valley of Mexico, THE ANGRY EARTH tells the story of Blackwing, a young man captured in a bloody slave raid.  He was sold in the market at The Place of Song and Dance to a farming family.  His mixed feelings for his owners would be tested when an earthquake and volcanic eruption destroys their land.

With these two books, Carl showed he was an original storyteller.

He also wrote and illustrated GRANADA, SURRENDER!  A story about a young man who, hoping to join Columbus on his adventurous voyage, becomes embroiled in the Siege of Granada — the Spanish battle to drive the Moors from Spain.

Carl, who never married, passed at age 92 in New York City.

His artwork survives.

Here’s the Kidwell book cover I spoke of:

In 1953, Bouregy & Curl Inc published SAGAS OF THE MOUNTED POLICE, collecting eight short stories by best selling Northwestern writer William Byron Mowery.

For SAGAS, Carl Kidwell painted a mutiple-scene cover somewhat in the style of artists who had once painted popular murals and pictorial maps — like Stephen J Voorhies, who had done the cover art for William Mowery’s first Mountie collection, THE LONG ARM OF THE MOUNTED.

The upper left corner of the Kidwell’s SAGAS cover, for instance, shows an encounter of some Mounties with Sitting Bull’s Sioux when the war chief had sought refuge in Canada following the Little Bighorn.  The other scenes blend together in an almost patriotic poster motif of a people looking to the promised future of the West, including a Mountie holding a woman in a blue and white dress.

In his Foreword to this edition, Mowery wrote: “Most of these stories, since their original magazine appearance, have been published in various high-school and college English texts.  I have a suspicion that it was the character of the Police heroes and fascination of the Canadian plains, Rockies and the North…that led to their being selected as examples of the raconteur‘s art…”

And also because Mowery was one of the finest writers to chose the history of the North-West Mounted as his theme.  Although his mention of that “fascination” also shows the immense popularity that our Canadian Mounties once had in national and in world culture.

Now here’s a mystery:

Nine years later, Bouregy reprinted SAGAS OF THE MOUNTED POLICE through its new paperback subsidiary, Airmont Books.  The Airmont line tended to also reprint the artwork from the original hardcovers.  But this paperback edition had a new cover illustration and the artist was uncredited.  Could have been Carl Kidwell, but not certain.  Carl had done a number of Western covers for Bouregy over those years…

Airmont Books reprinted SAGAS in 1962 as a mass market paperback retitled TALES OF THE MOUNTED POLICE.

As with SAGAS, the cover had a multiple-scene motif, but simpler.  This time one of action (fist fight) and romance (Mountie holding woman in blue and white dress).

On the back cover, over a line drawing of a Mountie gazing at a forest-rimmed lake and soaring mountains beyond it, Airmont stated: “The stories in this book are of the early Northwest Mounted…

“William Byron Mowery knew the Northwest and he knew many of these men.  He met them in the twilight of their lives, at their Calgary reunions and visited them in their homes — and out of the incidents related at these meetings, and the spirit of the men themselves, have come these tales.”

Books well worth collecting, mon ami, for the writing and for the artwork.

– Brian Alan Burhoe

Did You Enjoy This Post?

IF SO, YOU’VE GOT TO SEE “THE WRITERS OF THE NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE” — MY MOST POPULAR LITERARY HISTORY POST:

“Thanks for a wonderful in-depth article on Mountie fiction. I’m a big fan of the Mounties and I really enjoyed the amount of details you provided and found many, many more books to put on my wish list.” Jack

“I just discovered your blog recently and need to dig deeper into it. That post on Mountie fiction is great.” James Reasoner

(Cover art of August, 1935 edition of Mystery Adventures by H J Ward, illustrating “Yukon Madness” written by L Ron Hubbard.)

When our Canadian Mounted Police first arrived in the lawless Wild West, they soon entered our National Mythology.  A look at the many writers who helped create that heroic Mythology.  Including William Byron Mowery.  And richly illustrated with vibrant book and magazine covers.  FREE TO READ ==>  The GREATEST AUTHORS OF NORTH-WEST MOUNTED POLICE FICTION

 

[1] Books illustrated by Carl Kidwell include:

RENEGADE SHERIFF by W C Tuttle
STOLEN BY INDIANS by Dorothy Heiderstadt
SMOKE JUMPERS by Nels Jorgensen
THE BARREL by Ester Wier
ISLAND GHOST by Janet Randall
TRUE ADVENTURE OF SPIES by Manuel Komroff
SMUGGLERS’ ISLAND by Martha C King
POSSE OF TWO by Gertrude Bell
THE DARK OF THE CAVE by Ernie Rydberg
BIG LEAGUE SANDLOTTERS by William R Cox
TO SURVIVE WE MUST BE CLEVER by Gertrude E Finney
BUFFALO GRASS by C L Murphy
ALFRED AND THE SAINT by Priscilla D Willis
THE RACE BETWEEN THE FLAGS by Priscilla D Willis
SUN EAGLE by Geraldine Wyatt
THE SWAMP FOX by Marion Marsh Brown
WINDS OF REBELLION by Ernest Haycox
CRY VIVA! by William Hopson
THIS RANGE IS MINE by Paul Evan
THE REDBIRDS ARE FLYING by May Nelson
THE MYSTERY OF THE GREAT SWAMP by Marjorie A Zapf

[2] When the Navy Report of Engagement on the sinking of the USS Quincy was later declassified, Carl was able to obtain a copy.  The report described an unexpected attack of enemy shells exploding topside and torpedoes hitting below, “the hanger and well deck blazing inferno, the steam escaping from #1 Stack was deafening, and Battle II in flames.”  The report didn’t solve Carl’s insistent questions about Logan’s final hours.

 

Aztec Cover Design by Carl Kidwell from ARROW IN THE SUN
 

For more information on Carl Kidwell, see Donald E Thompson’s INDIANA AUTHORS AND THEIR BOOKS 1916-1966, Wabash College, 1974

Carl Kidwell – Artist and Writer – His Illustrations and Stories

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Fur Trade Animal Trapping Report Exposes Best and Worst States

 

Every Animal Matters!  No More Fur Coats!  New Fur Trade “Best & Worst” Report from Born Free USA…

 

 

As much as I’ve prowled the forevergreen forest, I’ve only seen a wild Lynx up close once. We surprised each other.  And for a long moment we watched each other.  That animal, with its black-tufted ears and deep golden eyes was the most beautiful cat I’ve ever seen.  And then it was gone…

It’s been five years since I first put my most controversial post online.  It said this:

“We have beavers — and their dams — at the lower corner of our property.  And love to watch them swimming and playing.  If you’ve ever heard a beaver kit calling out with its comical, human babylike cry, you couldn’t help but respond with a warm laugh.”

Innocent enough, eh?

After all, the Beaver has always been our National Animal.  But then I said this:

“You must remember that Canadians didn’t pick the beaver as our national symbol in the first place.  The Hudson’s Bay Company did.  The London-based HBC made its fortune on the furs and skins harvested in colonial Canada, including the rich beaver pelts that were shipped to England to be made into those fashionable beaver felt hats for the well-heeled gentlemen of the age.

“Beavers weren’t cute, industrious and ecologically essential creatures to the company managers and shareholders of the day; they were raw material.  As an image, the Beaver was really a symbol of foreign corporate greed…”

And the bird poop caught a gust of gale-force wind blowing my way.  Especially when I went on to explain why our Canadian National Animal should now be the Polar Bear! [1]

I’ve nothing against traditional hunting, fishing and trapping for food and existence.  My father, born on a Nova Scotia farm, did it.  And he did it expertly and humanely.  He taught me how.  I CAN do it — I choose not to.

No, it’s the bloody Commercial Fur Trade that has outlived its time and should be hung out to dry.

In Canada, wild animals that are still commercially trapped for their skins include the badger, bear (yes, even grumpy, comical bears), bobcat, cougar, coyote, fisher, fox, hare, marten, mink, muskrat, otter, rabbit, raccoon, skunk, squirrel, weasel, wolves and the wolverine.  Yes, and the beaver, still.  And the beautiful lynx.

South of the border, the list is just as extensive.  But our American friends are doing something about it, bless ’em…

BORN FREE USA, a global leader in animal welfare and wildlife conservation, has released its 2017 Trapping Report, which gives a “letter grade to each of the 50 U.S. states based on the existence and effectiveness of the state’s animal trapping regulations on animal welfare, wildlife conservation and public safety.” [2]

Prashant K. Khetan, CEO and general counsel for Born Free USA, explained in a news release, “Indiscriminate body-crushing traps are used to capture or kill furbearing animals who are deemed a ‘nuisance’ or who are valued only for the fur on their backs.

“In many instances, animals are caught in these brutal traps, but remain trapped for days, slowly dying while subject to the elements, other animals, physical pain and emotional torture. And both targeted and non-targeted animals—including household pets and endangered species—fall victim to these traps.

“While our report card applauds the states that are leading the way to end trapping, we must also ask ourselves, ‘what kind of a society allows this senseless butchering of our beloved wildlife to continue year after year?’ It must end. And end now.”

The report card is compiled by “reviewing the laws of each individual state on a variety of different trapping-related topics and then, using a weighted point system, assigning individual letter grades and a final weighted grade to each state.

“Grades also include positive marks for prohibiting the trapping of bobcats and otters, two species native to most states but vulnerable to overexploitation.”

According to Born Free USA’s analysis, only four states received an “A” grade or better:

California
Colorado
Hawaii
Washington

Conversely, 14 states received an “F” grade:

Alaska
Arkansas
Idaho
Iowa
Louisiana
Missouri
Montana
Nevada
North Carolina
North Dakota
South Dakota
Texas
Virginia
Wyoming

“As the report clearly shows, most states don’t have good laws on trapping,” Khetan noted. “We’re working to shed light on the issue and help the states who are most interested in turning around their legislation.”

For those who are interested in standing up against trapping, Khetan recommends that they:

  • Learn more about the anti-trapping and anti-fur movement here
  • Write their government representatives to encourage them to enact and enforce better laws, including to prevent trapping on public lands
  • Support fur free products/retailers

Fur Free!  It’s important, mon ami.  The time of the fur coat as a fashion statement has gone.  Every animal matters.

– Brian Alan Burhoe

Do You Agree With This Wildlife Post?

IF SO, YOU MIGHT WANT TO READ WOLFBLOOD — MY MOST POPULAR ANIMAL STORY:

“I JUST READ WOLFBLOOD AGAIN FOR GOOD MEASURE.  ONE FOR ANY WOLF LOVER.  ENJOYED IT BUT WISH IT WAS A FULL LENGTH NOVEL.” – Gina Chronowicz @ginachron

“GREAT SHORT STORY!  DOES REMIND ME OF CALL OF THE WILD, WHITE FANG…” – Evelyn @evelyn_m_k

A “powerful, gripping tour de force” in the Jack London Tradition of a lone Gray Wolf and it’s search for its place in the vast Canadian forests.  FREE TO READ ==>  WOLFBLOOD: A Wild Wolf, A Half-Wild Husky & A Wily Old Trapper

 

[1] SEE “What is Canada’s National Animal? The Polar Bear! A Patriot’s Rant…” at www.CivilizedBears.com/Canadas-national-animal-polar-bear/

[2] About Born Free USA: Born Free believes that every animal matters. Inspired by the Academy Award-winning film, Born Free, we work locally, nationally and internationally on the conservation frontlines, in communities, classrooms, courtrooms and the halls of Congress, to end wild animal cruelty and suffering, and protect threatened wildlife. Born Free USA also operates one of the country’s largest wildlife sanctuaries, which provides a permanent home for 600 primates. Many are retired from research facilities, some rescued from inhumane conditions at circuses, zoos and private ownership. They have often endured a lifetime of abuse, neglect and cruelty. But at our sanctuary in Dilley, Texas, they are safe and live free.

Launched in 2002, Born Free USA is inspired by Virginia McKenna and her (late) husband Bill Travers, who, along with their son, Will, founded The Born Free Foundation (UK) in 1984. Their experience in Kenya filming the classic 1966 Academy Award-winning film Born Free, the story of Joy and George Adamson’s fight to successfully return Elsa the lioness to a wild and free life, launched the couple’s Compassionate Conservation movement, aimed at keeping wildlife in the wild. This movement continues to motivate millions of followers and activists across the globe. In 2007, Born Free USA merged with the Animal Protection Institute.

To view the 2017 Trapping Report Card, as well as the full report, visit http://www.bornfreeusa.org/trappingreportcard.

For a Canadian perspective, go to Barry Kent MacKay’s excellent Canadian Blog at www.bornfreeusa.org/weblog_canada.php

More at www.bornfreeusa.org, www.twitter.com/bornfreeusa, and www.facebook.com/bornfreeusa.

Fur Trade Animal Trapping Report Exposes Best and Worst States

Source: Civilized Bears, Born Free USA & PRNewswire

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Abigail Pit Bull Pup Who Lost Ear In Dog Fight Wins Hero Dog Award

 

“Have you heard of Bonnets for Abigail?  Meet Abigail, the puppy who was gifted amazing headwear from fans around the world after her ear was ripped off by attacking dogs.”

 

“Bonnets for Abigail — Courageous canine who was victim of dog fighting wins top title of ‘American Hero Dog’ at the 2017 American Humane Hero Dog Awards®”

It’s personal!

When we see human cruelty to animals, we still get shocked.  We feel their pain, quite literally.  Then we get angry.  I think of the Jared Keeso (as Patrol Officer Ben Chartier) line in an episode of 19-2: “We’re supposed to be better than this.”

We really should be more evolved than this.

When the photos of the deadly condition of the pit bull puppy Abigail first appeared online, there was an emotional burst of anger and love.  Those first images revealed a mangled dog — her right ear ripped from her head, leaving a raw gash, among other dire injuries from dog attacks (I’m not showing those early photos on this post, but you can find them). [1]

And now Abigail is in the news again.  This time in a really good way:

Following nearly a million votes by the American public and the opinions of an expert panel of celebrity animal lovers and dog experts, Abigail, a one-year-old pit mix from Lehigh Acres, Florida has been named this year’s most courageous canine, besting 187 other heroic hounds and capturing the top title of “American Hero Dog” at the 2017 American Humane Hero Dog Awards®…

Abigail is a gal that did not ask for the life she was forced to live. She was found in a horrific condition, barely alive, wandering the streets of Miami, and taken to a rescue center where she was examined. She was anemic and infested with ticks. Scars covered her bloody head, neck, back legs, and half her face was missing with the skin ripped off down to the eardrum.

She smelled terrible because of multiple infections, and was covered in dried mud. Experts suspected she was a victim of dog fighting. Her injuries were at least a week old and she almost lost her life.

Abigail had several major surgeries and extensive skin grafts. She had weeks of hospitalization and daily bandage changes, which led to the launch of her Mission.

Her vet and her vet tech were changing her bandages, and the way they held the gauze on her head made them look like bonnets…

In solidarity people from all over the world started sending bonnets and now the Facebook page “Bonnets for Abigail” has more than 12,000 followers.

Despite the terrible injuries inflicted on her, Abigail is a heroic example of bravery and overcoming, and is using her public platform to teach forgiveness and bring awareness to the importance of ending dog fighting.

For her extraordinary bravery and good works, Abigail won the American Humane Hero Dog Awards’ “Emerging Hero Dog” category for ordinary dogs who do extraordinary things.

A “Galaxy of Stars” Honors Hero Dogs Including Jay Leno and Billy Crystal…

The sold-out, star-studded awards honoring America’s most courageous canines were hosted at the Beverly Hilton Hotel last night by television and film star James Denton and model and animal advocate Beth Stern, accompanied by a galaxy of celebrity stars and presenters including Josie Bissett, Lacey Chabert, Danielle Fishel, Vivica Fox, Daisy Fuentes, Carrie Ann Inaba, Bailee Madison, Kellie Martin, Debbie Matenopolous, Cameron Mathison, Danica McKellar, Brandon McMillan, Barbara Niven, Alexa and Carolos Penavega, Mark Steines, Alison Sweeney, Courtney Thorne-Smith, Alicia Witte and more.

Jay Leno and Billy Crystal provided delightful pre-taped video skits. Richard Marx provided the lead musical performances. Before the show, the audience was treated to the artistry of The Alex Donner Band and a special appearance by Hallmark Channel’s Goodwill Ambassador Happy the Dog.

“The American Humane Hero Dog Awards were created to honor some of the most extraordinary heroes the world has ever known, the very best of our best friends,” said Dr. Robin Ganzert, president and CEO of American Humane, the country’s first national humane organization. [2]

“These courageous canines have gone above and beyond the call of duty, saving lives on the battlefield, comforting the ill, aged and afflicted, bringing hope to those who have lost it, and reminding us of the powerful, age-old bond between animals and people.

“All seven category winners tonight exemplify what it means to be a hero, and we hope that their stories – and Abigail’s – will inspire people to value our animal friends and to recognize and honor how much they do for us every day.” [3]

Did Abigail ever find a Forever Home?  Yes, Abigail was adopted by a Fort Myers couple, Megan and Jason Contreras. Bless ’em!

– Brian Alan Burhoe

Did You Like This Animal Welfare Post?

IF SO, YOU MIGHT WANT TO READ WOLFBLOOD — MY MOST POPULAR ANIMAL STORY:

“I JUST READ WOLFBLOOD AGAIN FOR GOOD MEASURE.  ONE FOR ANY WOLF LOVER.  ENJOYED IT BUT WISH IT WAS A FULL LENGTH NOVEL.” – Gina Chronowicz @ginachron

“GREAT SHORT STORY!  DOES REMIND ME OF CALL OF THE WILD, WHITE FANG…” – Evelyn @evelyn_m_k

A warmhearted, authentic adventure in the Jack London Tradition of a lone Northern Wolf and it’s search for its place in the vast Canadian wilderness.  FREE TO READ ==>  WOLFBLOOD: A Wild Wolf, A Half-Wild Husky & A Wily Old Trapper

 

[1] What happened?  Who or what had attacked her so savagely?  From all the trauma, it was believed that the young Abigail had been a “bait dog.”  What is a bait dog?  A bait dog is tied out alone and helpless by organized dog fighters to train their “sport” dogs to attack and mutilate an opponent.  A terrifying experience.  Especially since bait dogs are usually either trusting pets who have been dognapped or puppies not wanted by dog fighters because the pups are too gentle to make effective fighting dogs.

[2] About American Humane: American Humane is the country’s first national humane organization, founded in 1877. For more information, visit www.americanhumane.org.

[3] The seventh annual Hero Dogs Awards is sponsored by the Lois Pope LIFE Foundation, Inc. and will be broadcast nationally on Hallmark Channel October 26 at 8 pm ET/PT, 7 pm Central Time.

Abigail Pit Bull Pup Who Lost Ear In Dog Fight Wins Hero Dog Award

Source: Civilized Bears, American Humane & PRNewswire

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Teddy Bears, Grizzly Bears & The National Wildlife Refuge System

 

Of Teddy Bears, Grizzly Bears & The National Wildlife Refuge System – A Celebration – Or a Rant?

 

 

It’s been 114 years since President Teddy Roosevelt created the National Wildlife Refuge System, the heroic beginning of the idea of saving our endangered wildlife.  One hundred and fourteen years!

First it was birds.  Then fish.  Soon Teddy was “setting aside forest reserves and public lands as game refuges for the preservation of the bison, wapiti, and other large beasts once so abundant in our woods and mountains and on our great plains, and now tending toward extinction.”  So fierce was Teddy that he even ordered a detachment of US Marines to Midway Atoll to “prevent the taking of birds and their eggs by Japanese nationals.”  Bully for him!

There are humans who really believe that the Earth, our living Blue Planet, belongs just to them. That every other living thing, from a tiny wild strawberry plant in the woods to a giant (and hungry!) wild bear, is just there to be treated as they selfishly please.

When I find a cluster of small red wild strawberries in the shadowed forest, I sample a few of the sweet berries (more delicious than ANY commercial berry) and leave the rest for other wildlife — or to provide seeds for new plants.

When I meet a bear in the wildwood, I remember Grey Owl’s wise words: “Your bear is really a good fellow. He has a humourous outlook on life.” And I remember my father’s teaching: “Don’t be afraid. Never run away from a wild animal.” So, humming a happy tune, I saunter off at an angle.

The only exception, said Dad, was “Skunks. Best to run from a skunk.” And I’ve obeyed that directive, too. Especially if it turned around and, lifting its bushy black and white tail, presented tail-gunner position.

If you’ve read a few of my wandering rants, then you know this about me: I love the forest.

And I love those who have likewise written about it.

“There are no words that can tell the hidden spirit of the Wilderness, that can reveal its mystery, its melancholy and its charm,” Teddy Roosevelt once commented.

But I think Teddy did a pretty good job of finding those words: “We have fallen heirs to the most glorious heritage a people ever received, and each one must do his part if we wish to show that the nation is worthy of its good fortune…

“We have become great because of the lavish use of our resources. But the time has come to inquire seriously what will happen when our forests are gone, when the coal, the iron, the oil, and the gas are exhausted, when the soils have still further impoverished and washed into the streams, polluting the rivers, denuding the fields and obstructing navigation.

“It is also vandalism to wantonly destroy or to permit the destruction of what is beautiful in nature, whether it be a cliff, a forest, or a species of mammal or bird. Here in the United States we turn our rivers and streams into sewers and dumping-grounds, we pollute the air, we destroy forests, and exterminate fishes, birds and mammals — not to speak of vulgarizing charming landscapes with hideous advertisements. But at last it looks as if our people were awakening.

“It is an incalculable added pleasure to any one’s sum of happiness if he or she grows to know, even slightly and imperfectly, how to read and enjoy the wonder-book of Nature.” [1]

You can see why Teddy Roosevelt remains this ol’ Canadian boy’s favourite US President. Teddy not only found the words, he found the determination, passion and energy to put them into action! Bully for him!

TR’s founding of his National Wildlife Refuge System and National Parks are his greatest gifts to our living planet. He later called them “my proudest achievements.”

“Just a big Teddy Bear?”

While Roosevelt is best remembered in parts of the world (especially northern Europe and the British Isles) because he once spared a bear while on a hunting trip and had a stuffed toy named in his honour, I think that the message must get out:

There was a time when one tough, ornery man who loved the Wilderness and all of the wild creatures who lived there (including bears!) had the grit to stand up to what he called “Shortsighted persons, or persons blinded to the future by desire to make money in every way out of the present” — and to lead in establishing and popularizing the Conservation movement.

What an achievement!

Although the question remains — what has been accomplished in the 108 years since Theodore Roosevelt was President?

Well, President Richard Nixon created the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in 1970, bless him.

Remember Acid Rain? Canadian Conservative Prime Minister Brian Mulroney began negotiations with President Ronald Reagan in 1986 on the deadly phenomenon. The Canada-US Acid Rain Treaty was signed by Brian Mulroney and President George H W Bush in 1991. Our Great Lakes are showing sure signs of recovery.  All because three brave men saw a real problem and found a solution.

But now there is this: Jeff Flocken, North American Regional Director for the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) [2], recently issued the following statement regarding the passage of S J Res 18 in the U.S. Senate and its H J Res 69 incarnation in the House:

“While America is celebrating the 114th anniversary of the National Wildlife Refuge System [3], the U.S. Senate has failed to take a stand for keystone species living on these same public lands. IFAW condemns the passage of S.J. Res. 18 and its House-passed counterpart, H. J. Res. 69, which allow for the killing of iconic animals including grizzlies and wolves — as well as their young — on federal refuge lands across Alaska.

“This lethal legislation will permit the use of barbaric devices like leg-hold traps, which can leave animals struggling and suffering for days, and neck snares that slowly strangle entangled wildlife — all for the purpose of artificially inflating ‘game’ populations. To call these practices cruel is a vast understatement.

“It is deeply concerning that the Senate has taken this step, placing Alaska’s wildlife, habitat and ecological balance in jeopardy. Congress seems intent on doing anything but protecting wildlife on lands that have been set aside for that very purpose.

“Irresponsible policies like S.J. Res. 18/H.J. Res. 69 are not only threatening our native wildlife, but also clearing a path to the reintroduction of extremely inhumane, indiscriminate and unsporting hunting practices on our shared lands,” concluded Jeff Flocken.

In a National Geographic article, Jani Actman and Rachael Bale wrote, “If passed, the measure would open the door to aggressive hunting practices such as shooting bears from airplanes, killing wolves and wolf pups in their dens, and hunting mother bears accompanied by their cubs.”

If this is true, then we’re witnessing something we’d thought we’d never see — the dismantling of Teddy Roosevelt’s spectacular National Wildlife Refuge System!

Just one example of the battle now being waged is the valiant attempt to save the great North American Grizzly bear:

“IFAW and The Northern Lights Wildlife Society, in collaboration with the British Columbia Ministry of Environment, are working to give orphaned grizzly bears a second chance,” announced the International Fund for Animal Welfare on its website. This is just one story in the ongoing effort to save our wild bears.

“In 1991, Canada’s Prairie population of Grizzly bears was declared extinct and their future in British Columbia, Alberta, the Yukon, the Northwest Territories, and Nunavut is in the balance. Human activities have also resulted in the geographic or genetic isolation of several grizzly bear populations — including eight that have been identified in southern British Columbia.

“On July 12, 2008, the first two orphaned grizzly bears in this pilot project, Suzy and Johnny, were released back to the wild. This was the first officially sanctioned grizzly bear release in Canadian history. Both bears were fitted with special satellite collars that allowed researchers to follow them throughout the summer. Since then, two additional Grizzlies were rescued, rehabilitated and released in the summer of 2009. Followed by four in June 2011, bringing the total to eight bears…”

The battle continues, mon ami. Great men and women [4] have gone before us — we’ve got to find that greatness among us again in these darkening times. The reason is both grand and simple…

As Teddy Roosevelt once said: “Wild flowers should be enjoyed unplucked where they grow.”

– Brian Alan Burhoe

Do You Agree with this Wildlife Post?

IF SO, YOU MIGHT WANT TO READ WOLFBLOOD — MY MOST POPULAR ANIMAL STORY:

“I JUST READ WOLFBLOOD AGAIN FOR GOOD MEASURE.  ONE FOR ANY WOLF LOVER.  ENJOYED IT BUT WISH IT WAS A FULL LENGTH NOVEL.” – Gina Chronowicz @ginachron

“GREAT SHORT STORY!  DOES REMIND ME OF CALL OF THE WILD, WHITE FANG…” – Evelyn @evelyn_m_k

A captivating and entertaining adventure in the Jack London Tradition of a lone Northern Wolf and it’s search for its place in the vast Canadian wildlands.  FREE TO READ ==>  WOLFBLOOD: A Wild Wolf, A Half-Wild Husky & A Wily Old Trapper

 

 

[1] SEE “Teddy Roosevelt Called it Climate Change in 1908” at www.CivilizedBears.com/Teddy-Roosevelt-Called-Climate-Change-1908/.

[2] Founded in 1969, IFAW saves animals in crisis around the world. With projects in more than 40 countries, IFAW rescues individual animals, works to prevent cruelty to animals, and advocates for the protection of wildlife and habitats. For more information, visit www.ifaw.org. Follow IFAW on Facebook and Twitter.

[3] With the support of fellow members of the patriotic Boone and Crockett Club, Teddy Roosevelt, by Executive Order on March 14, 1903, created the Pelican Island National Wildlife Refuge along the eastern coast of Florida.  This was quickly followed by other wildlife sanctuaries under the umbrella of Teddy’s newly established National Wildlife Refuge System.  Today, TR’s Wildlife Refuge System stretches over a total of 95 Million acres, including 544 national wildlife refuges, an area bigger than many countries.

[4] “Women have played a fundamental role in creating the entire Animal Rights movement.” SEE “Women Pioneers of Animal Rights” at www.CivilizedBears.com/Women-Pioneers-Animal-Rights-Mary-Tealby-Nell-Shipman-Ingrid-Newkirk-Marlice-van-Vuuren.

Teddy Bears, Grizzly Bears & The National Wildlife Refuge System

Source: Civilized Bears, International Fund for Animal Welfare and PRNewswire

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Hurricane Harvey Rescue Cat – Saving Lost Cats

 

“There are many cats and other animals who haven’t eaten for days and may be lost from their homes. We are eager to help the courageous people who are finding and saving these animals.”

 

Hurricane Harvey Rescue Cat
 

One of the more discouraging things coming out of the Hurricane Harvey tragedy for us was being accused of “Loving animals more than people — what’s wrong with you radical animal rights cults?” Lot of anger aimed at us because we love animals. And I think the innocent “snowflake” has a whole other meaning for these guys.

Of course our hearts went out to the people of Texas affected by those torrential rains and awful flooding. We know some of those people — have family there.

As always, our own first response was to give what we could to the Red Cross to help those good folks. Cheered when our Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, responding to a request from FEMA, ordered our Royal Canadian Air Force to airlift relief supplies to Texas, including “baby formula, blankets, cribs…”

And it was those people themselves who tore at out hearts with their tearful requests for help in finding their lost pets.

And so we applauded the valiant and caring attempts by such animal rescue groups as the ASPCA, AKC Humane Fund, IFAW Disaster Response Teams, American Humane Rescue Teams, among others…

The story of “Alley Cat Allies” especially caught our attention:

Alley Cat Allies [1] has deployed an expert, bilingual disaster response team and is sending additional resources to help Texas and Louisiana organizations rescue cats and other animals whose lives continue to be in peril because of Hurricane Harvey.

“Many people and animals have been displaced, shelters are overflowing and families were forced to make difficult decisions about what to do with their animals,” said Becky Robinson, president and founder of Alley Cat Allies.

“There are many cats and other animals who haven’t eaten for days and may be lost from their homes. We are eager to help the courageous people who are finding and saving these animals.”

In many cases, community cats, sometimes called feral cats, were left on their own when their human caregivers evacuated as floodwaters rose.

The Alley Cat Allies team will help shelters and caregivers throughout Texas and Louisiana to rebuild programs that were in place to help community cats, including Trap-Neuter-Return (TNR). They will also be forming a network of people to rescue cats, check on colonies, resume feeding them and place new cat houses and shelters as necessary.

“A member of the Alley Cat Allies Rapid Response Team loads a van with supplies and equipment.”

The Alley Cat Allies disaster response team started its work in Spring, a Houston suburb, by assisting the Texas Litter Control (TLC) organization.

TLC requested help as a member of the Alley Cat Allies Feral Friends Network. Alley Cat Allies has brought truckloads of traps, dens and cat carriers, which will all be in high demand. Additional supplies such as leashes, cat food, kitty litter, water, blankets and towels are also being delivered.

In Texas and Louisiana, Alley Cat Allies is offering emergency funds to overwhelmed shelters and organizations. In one such case, the Humane Society of Louisiana (HSLA) has used these funds for two disaster-ready transportation vehicles that are facilitating the rescue of hundreds of animals stranded by floodwaters.

Jeff Dorson, executive director of HSLA, thanked Alley Cat Allies for helping in a second consecutive year, after the organization previously responded to extreme flooding in 2016.

“Once more, Alley Cat Allies has come to our aid in a time of need,” Dorson said. “This critical support is helping us to save cats and other animals who need our help. The generosity, partnership and good-will are helping us to get through some very challenging days as we try to do as much good as we can.”

Alley Cat Allies will post updates about its hurricane relief efforts on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube, and donations to support its work can be made online at www.alleycat.org.

– Brian Alan Burhoe

Did you like this Animal Rescue Post?

IF SO, YOU MIGHT WANT TO READ WOLFBLOOD — MY MOST POPULAR ANIMAL STORY:

“I JUST READ WOLFBLOOD AGAIN FOR GOOD MEASURE.  ONE FOR ANY WOLF LOVER.  ENJOYED IT BUT WISH IT WAS A FULL LENGTH NOVEL.” – Gina Chronowicz @ginachron

“GREAT SHORT STORY!  DOES REMIND ME OF CALL OF THE WILD, WHITE FANG…” – Evelyn @evelyn_m_k

A heartfelt and thrilling tale in the Jack London Tradition of a lone Gray Wolf and it’s search for its place in the Great Northwoods.  FREE TO READ ==>  WOLFBLOOD: A Wild Wolf, A Half-Wild Husky & A Wily Old Trapper

 

[1] About Alley Cat Allies: Alley Cat Allies, headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, is “the global engine of change for cats. We protect and improve cats’ lives through our innovative, cutting-edge programs. We are seen around the world as a champion for the humane treatment of all cats. Founded in 1990, today Alley Cat Allies has more than 650,000 supporters and helps tens of thousands of individuals, communities and organizations save and improve the lives of millions of cats and kittens worldwide.” Its website is www.alleycat.org, and Alley Cat Allies is on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Google+ and YouTube.

Hurricane Harvey Rescue Cat – Saving Lost Cats
Source: Civilized Bears, Alley Cat Allies and PRNewswire

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Illegal Wildlife Trade From Monkeys to Endangered Rhinos

 

Illegal Wildlife Trade From Monkeys to Endangered Rhinos – Why Compassion Must Win Over Cruelty

 

 

Today’s trade in living wild animals and the parts of slaughtered wildlife has got to be a dark example of Humankind at our most inhuman. It’s just awful.

Cruelty may be part of Nature — but the message of Love and Compassion has also been part of Human nature from the beginning of our Homo Sapiens’ (“Wise Man”) adventure. Back, back to our civilized roots, when we first took wild wolf cubs into our homes, some of us have believed we can be a better part of Creation — and told stories about it.

Francis of Assisi, inspired by the greatest written message of Human history, the Sermon on the Mount, said “If you have men who will exclude any of God’s creatures from the shelter of compassion and pity, you will have men who will deal likewise with their fellow men.”

And some of the best of us, our sisters, our brothers, are stepping up to do something about it.

One of the oldest trades in wildlife has been of our closest primate relatives: chimps and monkeys as “companion animals.”  Today, a number of primate species face extinction because of the pet trade.

The story of just about every primate “companion” is the same: they are captured and taken from their mothers as babies — transported across the world to pet stores — purchased by well-meaning humans — then they grow older, bigger and need more interaction…

The various juvenile chimpanzees who played Tarzan’s Cheetah in movies and television soon became big strong adults and ended up forgotten in cages.

Most actors who portrayed Tarzan, like Ron Ely, accepted the “bites, scratches, sprains and battle scars as part of the territory.”  Although actor Mike Henry filed a lawsuit after a chimp named Dinky had “lashed out at me and ripped my jaw open.  It took twenty stitches to put my face back together. I was in a monkey-fever delirium for three days…”  Mike recovered.  Dinky was “destroyed.” [1]

Approximately 60% of the animals at Primarily Primates, a non-profit sanctuary in Bexar County, Texas, are discarded pets. “Typically the animal starts to bite and become aggressive, or picks up a nervous habit, like self-harming or feverishly pacing in the cage, or screaming. Non-human primates are most often abandoned by their owners between the ages of two and eight (depending on the species), after they have started maturing, and sometimes after their owners have had their teeth removed in an effort to restrict their assertive personalities.” [2]

But there is hope. With “illegal wildlife trade being one of the most serious threats to biodiversity,” the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) has become one of a number of wildlife and wilderness advocates taking on the war against this heart-rending criminal activity. [3]

Just some of the recent animals being saved are:

1. PATAGONIAN PUMAS. Argentine Pumas, cousins to our North American cougar, are dropping in numbers in the Argentinian wilderness.

Early in the morning on August 23, 2017, IFAW, along with The Wild Animal Sanctuary (TWAS) and Forest Animal Rescue (FAR) welcomed two Patagonian Pumas at Miami International Airport. Their arrival signifies a two year effort to ensure the cats receive quality lifetime care in a true sanctuary.

In 2015, a zoo in Rawson, Argentina closed due to lack of funding and public pressure. Many animals were kept behind metal bars in barren cages, including the two pumas.

“We are excited at the opportunity to bring these pumas to Forest Animal Rescue. We are committed to ensuring that wildlife everywhere has the best chance possible to live out their lives as wild as possible given their circumstances. Given the age and history of these cats, that means lifetime care in a true sanctuary – one that doesn’t buy, sell or breed animals. Our success today highlights the importance our partnerships. IFAW works with experts throughout the global animal welfare community to ensure captive wildlife is provided every opportunity to live in peace and comfort,” said Meredith Whitney, IFAW’s Wildlife Rescue Program Officer.

2. MINKE WHALES. A report from the Expert Panel appointed by the International Whaling Commission’s (IWC) Scientific Committee concluded that Japan’s so-called ‘scientific’ whaling program (“lethal sampling of whales”) was not justified. The announcement was published just three days after the Japanese whaling fleet returned to port after taking its full quota of 333 Minke Whales as part of its Southern Ocean ‘NEWREP-A’ whaling program.

“The bottom line is that another panel of scientific experts again found that Japan had not shown that the proposed kill of whales would yield any scientific benefits. If Japan continues to pursue its whaling agenda in the face of such overwhelming opposition, anti-whaling governments may need to bring international law to bear on Japan once more,” said Matthew Collis, Acting Director of International Environmental Agreements at the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW).

3. SOUTH AFRICAN RHINOS. Experts stated that South Africa’s first ever legal auction of rhinoceros horn enriched a favoured few, and just speeded up the road to extinction for one of the world’s most endangered species. The grisly auction took place on Monday, August 21.

“John Hume (South Africa’s biggest private rhino breeder, who owns about 1,500 rhinoceros) says the profits from the sale of the horn will help him better protect his rhino populations. But the fact that this auction is being so vigorously marketed to the countries that have the highest demand for rhino horn calls into question Hume’s motive, which in IFAW’s opinion is driven by profit and profit alone with no conservation benefit,” explained Dr Joseph Okori, Director for Southern Africa of the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), a world expert on rhino conservation.

4. BARBARY MACAQUES. “IFAW unveils key partnership with Morocco to tackle illegal wildlife trade.”

In the last three decades, the total populations of Barbary Macaques (Macaca sylvanus), also known as Barbary Apes, in Morocco and Algeria, have dwindled from around 23,000 to 6,500.

The decrease is due to the destruction of their natural habitat, the cedar forest, and the capture of baby macaques by poachers for the pet trade.

Home of many remarkable species, including these notable endangered Macaques, Morocco is stepping up its efforts to protect its stunning natural habitats and rich wildlife diversity, in a context where wildlife crime often has a striking impact upon natural resources, cultural heritage and even security in many countries and regions of the world.

With illegal wildlife trade being one of the most serious threats to biodiversity, the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW) and the Moroccan government’s High Commission for Water, Forests, and Combating Desertification (HCEFLCD) are announcing a partnership to strengthen the protection of wildlife and habitats.

“This month’s agreement between IFAW and the HCEFLCD is an opportunity that will allow new initiatives to strengthen the fight against poaching, dismantle wildlife trafficking routes and enhance the rescue and rehabilitation of wild confiscated animals, notably under the framework of the Born to be Wild project, which is currently under discussion between the two parties.”

5. AFRICAN GIRAFFES. In the last 30 years, giraffes have suffered a devastating population decline of almost 40%. Wildlife groups are seeking to save the species from a silent extinction.

A legal petition has been filed by the Center for Biological Diversity, Humane Society International, The Humane Society of the United States, International Fund for Animal Welfare and Natural Resources Defense Council, seeking “Endangered” status for the Giraffe. Facing mounting threats from habitat loss, being hunted for their meat, and the international trade in bone carvings and trophies, Africa’s giraffe population has plunged almost 40% in the past 30 years and now stands at just over 97,000 individuals.

“Giraffes have been dying off silently for decades, and we have to act quickly before they disappear forever,” explained Tanya Sanerib, a senior attorney at the Center for Biological Diversity. “There are now fewer giraffes than elephants in Africa. It’s time for the United States to step up and protect these extraordinary creatures.”

– Brian Alan Burhoe

Do You Agree with this Wildlife Post?

IF SO, YOU MIGHT WANT TO READ WOLFBLOOD — MY MOST POPULAR ANIMAL STORY:

“I JUST READ WOLFBLOOD AGAIN FOR GOOD MEASURE.  ONE FOR ANY WOLF LOVER.  ENJOYED IT BUT WISH IT WAS A FULL LENGTH NOVEL.” – Gina Chronowicz @ginachron

“GREAT SHORT STORY!  DOES REMIND ME OF CALL OF THE WILD, WHITE FANG…” – Evelyn @evelyn_m_k

A heartfelt and thrilling tale in the Jack London Tradition of a lone Gray Wolf and it’s search for its place in the Great Northwoods.  FREE TO READ ==>  WOLFBLOOD: A Wild Wolf, A Half-Wild Husky & A Wily Old Trapper

 

“My reason for not getting any more apes is that my thoughts on apes have changed over the years.  I really think it’s unfair for apes to be made available to trainers anymore.  Would you believe that?  I’m including myself, even though I love them very much.”  Carmine “Buddy” Mennella, Hollywood animal trainer of chimp J Fred Muggs

[1] From “Monkeying Around On The Sets,” Chapter I of THE GREAT SHOW BUSINESS ANIMALS by David Rothel, A S Barnes Co, 1980.  Great book!  Highly recommended.

[2] https://primarilyprimates.org/inside-the-exotic-pet-trade/

[3] About IFAW (International Fund for Animal Welfare):
“Founded in 1969, IFAW rescues and protects animals around the world. With projects in more than 40 countries, IFAW rescues individual animals, works to prevent cruelty to animals, and advocates for the protection of wildlife and habitats. For more information, visit www.ifaw.org. Follow us on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter at @action4ifaw.”

When Hurricane Harvey struck Texas, Shannon Walajtys, IFAW Disaster Response Manager, announced, “We are deeply saddened by the devastation caused by hurricane Harvey and will do our very best to serve the communities impacted by this storm. We deployed water rescue teams and have emergency sheltering and wildlife rescue teams on standby to respond as soon as needed.”

Illegal Wildlife Trade From Monkeys to Endangered Rhinos

Source: Civilized Bears, International Fund for Animal Welfare and PRNewswire

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